News

Amy J Hamilton Introduces Radish Fiction

Radish what now? I’d never heard of it before either. What, you have? Well, go and read my books then.

For the rest of you, here’s the background.

Radish Fiction is a free app containing serialised fiction in bite-sized chunks or episodes. (Like radishes, get it? Bite-sized.) It’s aimed at those who like to read a bit at a time. Which, to be fair is me. We’re all busy, but we can generally manage ten minutes of reading here and there.

 

The first three episodes of any book will always be free.

 

There are three ways books are priced:

 

Some books are totally free.

 

In others, episode 4 onwards will become free at a rate set by the author, say a new episode every week. But, the reader can unlock an episode early by paying 3 Radish coins per episode (around 30-42p per episode). Those who don’t want to pay, just need to wait until the next episode is released for free.

 

The third option allows authors to be paid for their work. All episodes after the three free ones cost 3 coins.

 

Authors are invited to write for Radish, unlike other platforms where there is nothing to stop anyone from publishing a book. So, we have been vetted and deemed fit for publication. (What? How? No, seriously, I have!)

 

My latest book is available exclusively on the Radish Fiction app.

Missing Remnants latestMissing Remnants is a Sci-Fi murder mystery following a detective called Track. He has been forced totake three months off, just as a woman dies at his front door after asking for his help. Suspecting an outbreak, the Authority submits Track to a gruelling decontamination process, while someone ransacks his apartment and dismantles his pet robot dog, Banyon. With little help available to him, Track undertakes the investigation the Authority closes within hours. He’s being followed. He has no backup. His trusted colleagues are avoiding him. Someone is pretending to be his dead husband. Will Track survive to solve the mystery of the Missing Remnants?

So, download the app and read some bite-sized serialised fiction. Preferably mine…

https://radish.app.link/XzeRhS95lG

https://radishfiction.com/users/AmyJHamilton

 

As well as the nearest coffee shop, Amy J Hamilton can be reached here:

Twitter https://twitter.com/WriteNaughty

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15275986.Amy_J_Hamilton

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ajhworld/

Blog http://barkingmaddj.blogspot.co.uk/

Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/djcooper

Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Amy-J-Hamilton/e/B01N0ZHDEC/

Email ajh@djsworld.co.uk

 

Guest post by Amy J Hamilton

Radish what now? I’d never heard of it before either. What, you have? Well, go and read my books then.

For the rest of you, here’s the background.

Radish Fiction is a free app containing serialised fiction in bite-sized chunks or episodes. (Like radishes, get it? Bite-sized.) It’s aimed at those who like to read a bit at a time. Which, to be fair is me. We’re all busy, but we can generally manage ten minutes of reading here and there.

 

The first three episodes of any book will always be free.

 

There are three ways books are priced:

 

Some books are totally free.

 

In others, episode 4 onwards will become free at a rate set by the author, say a new episode every week. But, the reader can unlock an episode early by paying 3 Radish coins per episode (around 30-42p per episode). Those who don’t want to pay, just need to wait until the next episode is released for free.

 

The third option allows authors to be paid for their work. All episodes after the three free ones cost 3 coins.

 

Authors are invited to write for Radish, unlike other platforms where there is nothing to stop anyone from publishing a book. So, we have been vetted and deemed fit for publication. (What? How? No, seriously, I have!)

 

My latest book is available exclusively on the Radish Fiction app.

Missing Remnants latest

 

Missing Remnants is a Sci-Fi murder mystery following a detective called Track. He has been forced totake three months off, just as a woman dies at his front door after asking for his help. Suspecting an outbreak, the Authority submits Track to a gruelling decontamination process, while someone ransacks his apartment and dismantles his pet robot dog, Banyon. With little help available to him, Track undertakes the investigation the Authority closes within hours. He’s being followed. He has no backup. His trusted colleagues are avoiding him. Someone is pretending to be his dead husband. Will Track survive to solve the mystery of the Missing Remnants?

So, download the app and read some bite-sized serialised fiction. Preferably mine…

https://radish.app.link/XzeRhS95lG

https://radishfiction.com/users/AmyJHamilton

 

As well as the nearest coffee shop, Amy J Hamilton can be reached here:

Twitter https://twitter.com/WriteNaughty

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15275986.Amy_J_Hamilton

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ajhworld/

Blog http://barkingmaddj.blogspot.co.uk/

Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/djcooper

Amazon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Amy-J-Hamilton/e/B01N0ZHDEC/

Email ajh@djsworld.co.uk

 

Guest post by Amy J Hamilton

Reader Interview- Caz Pollard

Hi guys, for my reader interview today I have privilege of introducing Caz Pollard, an awesome BookTuber with a huge variety of reading interests. Her channel is brilliant too, I highly recommend her April Fools Book Tag video!

 

 ehhh
Hi, tell us a bit about yourself.
Hey I’m Caz, I like reading, taking photos, cats and Yorkshire Tea!

 

 

 

The-Raven-Cycle-Series

What makes a book cover catch your eye? Have you got a favourite?

I don’t really have one ‘thing’ that catches my eye on book covers, but I do love nice typography – this may be because I generally don’t look at covers when browsing books. Most of my ‘in real life’ book browsing happens in charity and second hand shops, so it’s more the spines that can catch my eye. I’ve never picked up a book *just* because of the cover / spine though, it has to sound like something I would genuinely be interested in. I can tell you that I don’t like girl in dress dramatically looking over her shoulder, but who does?

A few I will mention are The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater (these just work great as a set), Aristotle And Dante Discover The Secrets Of The Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz  (remember when I said I love a nice bit of typography?) and The Taste Of Cashews by Will Hartzell-Baird (which just does a great job of bringing the story to life in a picture)

 

 

When you’re reading a blurb, what would make you want to try that book? What would put you off?

This is a hard question, because I look for completely different things in for example fantasy, and in contemporary, but a punchy, to the point synopsis with a little about the world and/or the characters that doesn’t give too much away is a good start.

I’ve read a blurb before that mentions a road trip, and 150 pages into the book there hadn’t been one yet, so I’m not a fan of too much information leakage. A character death, a certain set of circumstances, an important ‘are they / aren’t they’ being revealed as one or the other on the back of the book are all no-no’s. Also World War anything. I literally get to ‘World W..’ in a synopsis and I’m like ‘nope’ and put it down.

 

 

What makes you love a character? Who are your favourites from the books you’ve read and why?

I mean come on guys, we all know sarcasm is the number one rule for ‘awesome characters that I love and will defend to the death’!

But yeah, I think just a character that actually has a personality is a good start. There are too many main protagonists that just blend together in a big ’16-year-old-brunette-short-not-like-other-girls-girl’ blob, so whenever someone actually feels like a real, well rounded, multifaceted person they stay with you. Basically pick any character, main or side, in The Raven Cycle and that’s what makes a good character.

Characters > plot. I recently read The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo, and for some reason it just didn’t captivate me like it did every other person in the world, but the fact that I was introduced to Nikolai made it all worth while! I like characters that are a bit angry, a bit angsty, a bit socially awkward and a bit broody (actually broody though, not ‘cool broody’) In the All For The Game trilogy by Nora Sakavic basically every character is a complete mess, and that’s why I love it so much!

 

 

What keeps a plot engaging, and makes you want to stick with a book/series until the end? Tell us about your favourite books!

If we’re talking high fantasy, distopian, urban fantasy, sci-fi etc then the over all arc – where are the characters going / what are they running from, and what happens between point A and point B has to be engaging and exciting. Being able to actually picture the surroundings due to great world building, showing growth in characters, having plot twists that are not obvious a mile away and having some cool shizz happen makes for a good story.

Lets take the ACOTAR series by Sarah J Maas for example – the first book, ACOTAR, is pretty much painting by numbers romance, with enough engaging shenanigans and twists to keep you involved, the second, ACOMAF is absolutely stunning, the characters, the world building, the fight scenes, the grey morals – perfect. Then the conclusion, ACOWAR completely stumbles to an end. Rehashed love scenes, lack of peril, obvious outcomes.

If we are talking contemporary, which I would probably go as far as to say is my favourite type of book, then I like it dark. If I’m not crying at the end of a book, did I even read a book? I like reading about dark subjects – basically think of anything that has the potential to have Trigger Warnings and that’s my jam.

These types of stories are very character driven, how do people deal with issues? Why do some people do one thing, and others act the complete opposite? How is life affected? This probably stems from my interest in psychology and true crime (and from starting out my reading career with Jacqueline ‘every-home-is-a-broken-home Wilson!) But let’s not forget the number one rule for character faves! Dark humour is the best humour!

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera is a book that destroyed me, for a third of the book I was crying. Abuse, suicide, violence, internalized hate, memory loss and the affect on family and friends – five stars!

 

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share about reading?

Yes, reading should be enjoyed.

I remember a few months ago I was browsing the books in a charity shop, and I over heard a woman telling her teenage son that he had to choose ‘harder’ books, ‘adult’ books, books that he won’t actually enjoy, but will push him as a reader. And while it is important to learn and get a better understanding of vocabulary and structure, it was so hard to not turn around and say ‘No! If you want to read a book, read it!’. Being forced to read books we have no interest in is probably one of the biggest reasons why a lot of people don’t read for fun.

So if I, a 26 year old woman, want to read about Percy Jackson, which is aimed at 12 year olds, you can bet your ass I’m going on that journey!

 

 

Thanks so much for sharing your take on reading, Caz! 

If you’d like to find out more about Caz and her BookTube channel, Catsandcamera, check out these links-

Goodreads

Instagram

YouTube

 

 

If you’d like to be interviewed and rant about books you love, either Contact Me here on the website or message me on Facebook.

If you enjoyed this, check out my last reader interview with Erica Graham.

 

Reader Interview- Erica Graham

Hi guys! Joining us to talk books today is Erica Graham, a wonderful lady with a great taste in literature 😉 

 

Author Photo

Hi, tell us a bit about yourself.

Hello. Thank you for having me. My name is Erica Graham. I am the author of the Talking Tales children’s series, but I am also an avid reader. I live in the US and enjoy time with my family, outdoor activities, and a good cup of tea.

 

 

What makes a book cover catch your eye? Have you got a favourite?

It is hard to pinpoint what makes a book cover catch my eye. I have great appreciation for artists who design a cover to be a piece of artwork, not just a simple image with a title and name, such as the classic covers on many of the Lord of the Rings books. However, simpler covers similar to Three, by Ted Dekker, have also drawn my eye.

 

When you’re reading a blurb, what would make you want to try that book? What would put you off?

If I read a blurb and then find myself thinking about it again 5 minutes later, I will go back and read the book. A blurb has to hook me in a few sentences and make me wonder what will happen next. If it is confusing, requiring multiple reads, or doesn’t leave me with a question, I probably will not pick the book up again.

 

What makes you love a character? Who are your favourites from the books you’ve read and why?

Though I enjoy a wide variety of characters, ones that are relatable are my favourite. I love average people who are turned hero by circumstance. A little sarcasm is always appreciated as well. I also enjoy gifted characters that have social deficits, but are strong in other areas. Some of my favourite characters range from Kitty Fairlow to Sherlock Holmes.

 

sherlock

 

What keeps a plot engaging, and makes you want to stick with a book/series until the end? Tell us about your favourite books!

Books that are filled with action or suspense keep me intrigued. Especially if there is a character or outcome I can root for. I find myself thinking about these books when I am not reading them and looking forward to finishing whatever I am working on so I can pick up the story again. I have been enjoying a lot of fantasy and even young adult reads lately. Some of my favourites have been The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins, Heirs of Power, by Kay Macleod, The Unicorn Hunter, by Del Henderson and Howl’s Moving Castle, by Diana Wynne Jones.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share about reading?

When I was growing up, I lost my love of reading for a short time. Luckily, like many other teens I knew, my love for reading was rekindled after a friend recommended a truly addicting series, Harry Potter. I now enjoy reading various genres and firmly believe in the saying that there is no such thing as people who don’t love reading, just people who have not found the right book.

 

What an honour to be included among such brilliant authors! Thank you so much Erica.

You can find out more about Erica and her own work at-

talkingtalesbooks.com

 

puppy

 

Hi, tell us a bit about yourself.

Hello. Thank you for having me. My name is Erica Graham. I am the author of the Talking Tales children’s series, but I am also an avid reader. I live in the US and enjoy time with my family, outdoor activities, and a good cup of tea.

 

Author Photo

 

What makes a book cover catch your eye? Have you got a favourite?

It is hard to pinpoint what makes a book cover catch my eye. I have great appreciation for artists who design a cover to be a piece of artwork, not just a simple image with a title and name, such as the classic covers on many of the Lord of the Rings books. However, simpler covers similar to Three, by Ted Dekker, have also drawn my eye.

 

When you’re reading a blurb, what would make you want to try that book? What would put you off?

If I read a blurb and then find myself thinking about it again 5 minutes later, I will go back and read the book. A blurb has to hook me in a few sentences and make me wonder what will happen next. If it is confusing, requiring multiple reads, or doesn’t leave me with a question, I probably will not pick the book up again.

 

What makes you love a character? Who are your favourites from the books you’ve read and why?

Though I enjoy a wide variety of characters, ones that are relatable are my favourite. I love average people who are turned hero by circumstance. A little sarcasm is always appreciated as well. I also enjoy gifted characters that have social deficits, but are strong in other areas. Some of my favourite characters range from Kitty Fairlow to Sherlock Holmes.

 

sherlock

 

What keeps a plot engaging, and makes you want to stick with a book/series until the end? Tell us about your favourite books!

Books that are filled with action or suspense keep me intrigued. Especially if there is a character or outcome I can root for. I find myself thinking about these books when I am not reading them and looking forward to finishing whatever I am working on so I can pick up the story again. I have been enjoying a lot of fantasy and even young adult reads lately. Some of my favourites have been The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins, Heirs of Power, by Kay Macleod, The Unicorn Hunter, by Del Henderson and Howl’s Moving Castle, by Diana Wynne Jones.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share about reading?

When I was growing up, I lost my love of reading for a short time. Luckily, like many other teens I knew, my love for reading was rekindled after a friend recommended a truly addicting series, Harry Potter. I now enjoy reading various genres and firmly believe in the saying that there is no such thing as people who don’t love reading, just people who have not found the right book.

 

What an honour to be included among such brilliant authors! Thank you so much Erica.

You can find out more about Erica and her own work at-

talkingtalesbooks.com

 

puppy

 

If you’d like to be interviewed and rant about books you love, either Contact Me here on the website or message me on Facebook.

If you enjoyed this, check out my last reader interview with Helen Picca.

 

Reader Interview- Helen Picca

Hi guys, up today I have another amazing reader interview. Helen Picca is here to tell us all about her love for reading.

Hi, tell us a bit about yourself.  

I am a former marketing exec from NYC and have a BA in English from Marymount College.  That is where I learned to love the written word.  I am an avid reader and like a variety of genres.  Having moved around the country, and have packed and unpacked many times, I no longer buy books, though I do prefer to read a book over an ebook.  Thankfully, we have a great library system, where I can get just about any book I am interested in reading.

 

What makes a book cover catch your eye? Have you got a favourite?

I don’t really choose books based on the book cover.  I am more interested in what the book is about, so read the jacket or back cover.  But if you placed 5 books in front of me, and told me to pick one, I would go for a book with a cover that had soft colors or a photo of a setting that I liked.

 

When you’re reading a blurb, what would make you want to try that book? What would put you off?

I want to read anything that has a secret or a mystery, or anything related to WWII.

What puts me off is anything macabre or truly dark.

 

since we fell

 

What makes you love a character? Who are your favourites from the books you’ve read and why?

I guess I like to see their humanity, their struggle.  One character I really liked recently was Rachel Childs from Lehane’s Since we Fell.  She was flawed and troubled, just trying to get through the day.  I also like Sage Singer in Picoult’s The Storyteller.   She is conflicted and struggling with a physical handicap.  I tried very hard to endow my character, Jennifer Long, with a great deal of humanity, as well as conflict, and hope I was successful

 

What keeps a plot engaging, and makes you want to stick with a book/series until the end? Tell us about your favourite books! 

I always want to know how it ends, perhaps that is just human nature.  It is rare that I start a book and don’t finish it.  I love when a book unfolds, revealing its secret, little by little, that is what keeps me engaged. Some authors are masters at that, like Dennis Lehane, or Patricial Cornwell, Michael Connelly.  I like mysteries and read a few series, like Kay Scarpetta, Harry Bosch and Jack REacher.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share about reading?

Yes, reading keeps your mind active.  Whether you read non-fiction or fiction, you learn something from every book.  Whether it is about an event or a place, or just about humans, you are learning which is good for the brain.

 

Thanks so much for chatting today with us, Helen!

 

If you’d like to check out Helen’s book you can find it here.

 

last frontier

 

If you’d like to be interviewed and rant about books you love, either Contact Me here on the website or message me on Facebook.

If you enjoyed this, check out my last reader interview with Angel Chadwick.

 

Reader Interview- Angel Chadwick

Hi guys, and welcome to another fantastic reader interview. This week we have Angel Chadwick here to tell us what she looks for in a book.

Hi, tell us a bit about yourself.Snapshot_20141110_1

Hi, my name’s Angel Chadwick. I’m a mom of a ten year old son who is autistic. I’m an avid reader, blogger and reviewer.

 

 

What makes a book cover catch your eye? Have you got a favourite?

The book cover doesn’t really make me want to read the book. I can look at a pretty or appealing cover and that is as far as it goes with me. I’m not a reader of other readers’ reviews either. What catches my eye is the title of a book. The title has to be unique and original. The title is what actually draws me into reading a book. The original content and the uniqueness of the writing will have to hold my attention throughout, since I have a very short attention span and get bored very easily and very quickly. If it doesn’t have that going for it. A pretty cover isn’t going to do it for me. No, I don’t have a favorite unless it’s in classic literature. I like dark books. The book must hold me with emotion, authenticity, intensity, passion, description, setting, very good character development and plot. The complex and compelling. Depth. Rawness. I’m not a strictly romance reader.  Meaning, if romance is the central theme I’m not interested. It can be in the book or not there at all. If it’s there there has to be another genre or subplot mixed into it to keep me interested.

 

When you’re reading a blurb, what would make you want to try that book? What would put you off?

The blurb being short and to the point with an air of mystery or atmospheric undertone to it would make me try a book. What would put me off  would be a book length blurb. You’ve told me everything I needed to know about the book, why would I want to read it, when basically I’ve already read it from the blurb. Other readers and reviewers in other groups on Goodreads have also said the same thing. (So I’m not alone in my thinking and feeling on this).  For this reason, I don’t make a habit of reading blurbs, if they’re too long. I also don’t read books with lengthy (like book report long) blurbs. To me it’s like going to a movie after you’ve been told all the spoilers or a good bit of them.  I don’t like spoilers. I rather find out what happens and have my own thoughts and opinions about it.

 

RWE

 

What makes you love a character? Who are your favourites from the books you’ve read and why?

Their emotion, depth, growth, strength, flaws, complexity. Like I said I like the dark stuff so Edgar Allan Poe and his works are one, but I also like Ralph Waldo Emerson, Bret Harte, Tennessee Williams, William Shakespeare,  Washington Irving, Sylvia Plath to name a few. I love how deep, raw, tragic their characters are. Ralph Waldo Emerson I like the value of his words, their authenticity. These authors works speak to me in depth on so many levels.  I can relate to it.

 

What keeps a plot engaging, and makes you want to stick with a book/series until the end? Tell us about your favourite books!

Relatability, emotion, depth, complex characters, originality, uniqueness, eye-catching title.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share about reading?

No.

 

If you want to see what books I’ve read and reviewed click here.

 

 

Thanks for telling us about your reading habits, Angel! 

 

If you’d like to be interviewed and rant about books you love, either Contact Me here on the website or message me on Facebook.

 

If you enjoyed this, check out my last reader interview with Bobbie B. Free.

 

 

Interview with James Collins

Hi guys, in the spotlight today we have a fascinating writer who is living the dream! Let me introduce James Collins.

Hi James! Tell us a bit about yourself.

James 2013I was born on the edge of Romney Marsh, in southern England, grew up there and moved away when I was 18. Cut to 36 years later and I am living on the Greek island of Symi, in the Dodecanese, with my husband-to-be. We have been here 15 years and for the past ten, I have been able to make my living from writing.

During those 36 years, I was involved in various occupations but also found time to write four stage musicals (and direct them), two choral works, perform in various cabaret shows and theatre pieces and write my first novel. I’ve always been creative and spent a lot of time creating with music. Now, I create with words.

 

You write different genres of books, blogs, screenplays, and more! How did you discover your passion for writing? Did you always see yourself branching out into so many areas?

I am still not sure where it came from, this need to create. My grandfather was a brilliant pianist and organist, so perhaps that’s where the music came from, but I also had excellent teachers at school. I was encouraged to write creatively from an early age and found that I enjoyed doing so. I was also encouraged to take part in school stage productions and fell in love with the idea of creating stories with words and music. My music teacher, when I was 17, asked me to write a revue for the school, which I did, and we staged two before I left at 18. The theatrical side went from there.

As for writing in other ways, books and screenplays, I started on my first novel when I was on holiday here on Symi, on my own. It’s that kind of inspiring place. That first novel was accepted by a small publisher, which gave me great hope to write more. Sadly they went bust before it came out, but the acceptance gave me the confidence to carry on trying. These days, with indie publishing, it’s even more rewarding. I can spend time writing rather than chasing agents and publishers.

As for the screenplays, that came about by accident. A friend was involved in a small production company who wanted a low budget horror script and asked me to have a go. After much reading and film watching, I came up with a script, it was accepted, worked on and finally filmed. The original story changed somewhat as the process went on but, keen to tell my story as it was first imagined, I wrote the novel version, ‘The Judas Inheritance.’ The film, now titled ‘The 13th‘, had been doing well on the film festival circuit, has picked up 18 awards so far and, it is hoped, will be distributed before too much longer.

As for branching out into so many areas, no, I never thought I would end up doing that. I wanted to be an actor but soon realised that I would rather create stories than play them out. I have always written something; business plans for theatre companies, reviews, website texts, articles… As Billy Crystal says in ‘Throw Mamma From the Train’, “A writer writes.”

 

 

Are you a big reader? What types of books do you enjoy?

Because of my interest in many genres, and in cross-genre storytelling, I read a wide variety of books, but yes, I am a reader – when I am not writing. I have an interest in history and read many factual books. I also read books akin to my genres, though not as many as I should. I love a good conspiracy theory, though don’t believe many of them, and read books on the subject. I’m always on the lookout for a good, true-life mystery that I can adapt to fit a story.

My favourite book in the horror genre is Dracula, though it’s more a romance than a horror in my opinion. My favourite non-fiction writer is Bill Bryson and, as I have written three books about moving to Greece and am working on a fourth with travel tales, I find him an inspiration.

 

Your (almost) daily blog, Symi Dream, is packed full of beautiful photos and posts about your island life. Where did the idea for this blog come from? Tell us a bit more about it and where your inspiration for the content comes from.

Long story short: years ago a group of us looked into the idea of setting up writing courses on Symi. Part of this was to have a website, which I designed and called Symi Dream. The courses never came about, but the site stuck. It grew from a once per month update to a blog and, as blogging became popular, it grew to what it is now, a six times per week update on whatever I am up to and whatever is going on in Symi. We had a photo shop for 11 years, and the blog helped publicise that; Neil, my husband-to-soon-be, is the photographer but, as he is now writing rather than owning a shop, I tend to be the one out and about snapping with the camera. He contributes from time to time.

Sometimes the content comes from a ‘sensible’ idea; I will talk about how to get to Symi, what to expect when you are here, etc. I’ll put together a travel piece for the blog as I am always keen to promote the island. At other times, it’s a case of talking about my day to day work, because that’s what I do. From six in the morning to five in the afternoon I’m at the desk, most days, and so there’s not a lot else to talk about. It depends on what mood I am in and what I have been doing. On Some days, usually after a party the night before, it’s only a few photos of the Symi scenery.

 

 

What kind of art do you love?

My mother is a brilliant artist, and I love her work; Sarah Bassett in Cornwall. I’m also rather drawn to abstract works and artists such as Mondrian but appreciate Impressionists too. I guess I am eclectic. Some of my favourite works of art are the ancient Egyptian tomb paintings and sculptures; they never cease to impress me.

 

Out of all the books you’ve written do you have a favourite?

It’s always the one I am going to write next because it is going to be better than the one before. No, honestly, it’s a hard question to answer, a bit like asking a parent who is their favourite child. But, being honest, my favourite to date has to be ‘The Saddling’, the last novel I published. For this story, a mystery set on the Romney Marshes, I delved into the local Kentish dialect and old ways of life. The village of Saddling where the story is set lives in the past in many ways, and so it was important to have characters use dialect. I love playing with words and was able to invent some of my own, as well as using real (though sometimes now obsolete) words from the county.

 

saddling ebook

 

I also took more time with this story, it took about four years from the first idea to finished book and started as an idea for a Hammer Productions type screenplay. I am very proud of it, and the reaction to it has led to me writing a follow-up, which is due out early next year, called ‘The Witchling’, and that has led me to consider writing two more set in Saddling. Four books, four elements, four village festivals, it all seems to make sense. So, my favourite has to be ‘The Saddling’ and, as I think about why, it’s also because I was able to make my main character a gay man without making him a typical/stock gay character. Through ‘The Saddling’ he comes to terms with who he is (and that realisation saves his life). In ‘The Witchling’, his love (for Barry, one of the villagers) is tested, and he is able to totally accept himself. What will happen to this gay hero in books three and four remains to be seen, and the books are not ‘gay’ stories. They are mainstream mystery/thrillers but I think it is about time we had more action heroes and main characters in mainstream genres who just happen to be gay.

 

There’s a quote on your author page, “James’s great talent lies in his careful observation of the absurd and the amusing, the dramas and the difficulties, and in reporting what he sees with kind humour and a writer’s eye for the details essential to lively travel writing.” Tell us your favourite amusing story from your travels.

First, I want to say that I am very proud of that quote. It was written by Anne Zouroudi, the author of The Greek Detective Mystery’s, published by Bloomsbury. It’s my favourite review so far.

Funny you should ask this question as I am currently putting together a book of travel (and other) pieces. ‘Symi, Stuff & Nonsense’ will be out in November and is a collection of travel tales, starting from when I was 16 and coming up to almost the present day. The trouble with this question is, there are so many amusing stories. So, forgive me if I don’t quote one. They are rather long anyway. As long as you have the eye for it, you can turn even a trip to the shops into an amusing travel story. Mine range from being bored to death by a milk-float spotter on an overnight ferry to Holland (did you now that in North London they used to use a P3-67D type electric motor in their class six floats?), to being led into the Hilton Hotel, Luxor, at gunpoint. Failed skiing attempts in Scotland to presenting an award for ‘The Best Threesome’ at a European gay porn awards ceremony. (Don’t ask.)

 

Describe your perfect day.

This would be any day when I have the whole day ahead of me to write. We will get up before sunrise, go for a three-mile walk up the mountain road and down again, watching the sun rise and clearing my head for the day to come. I will then be free to write – the best days are when I am editing a manuscript I have spent months writing, and the hard slog is over. Neil will take care of the household duties (he is incredibly supportive) while I edit away improving something and being harsh with myself, checking my overused words and improving the story. Later, in the afternoon, I will finish that and join Neil at the bar where he works a few hours. We will have a couple of glasses of wine and watch the village world go past, meet with friends and visiting tourists before returning home to watch a good film, or, better, sit on our balcony overlooking Symi harbour, with music playing as we watch the stars and boats, and remind ourselves how lucky we are to have achieved this way of life.

 

 

I see you’ve won lots of awards, congratulations! What has been the high point in your writing career and what are your next goals?

Receiving any five-star review for a book on Amazon is always a high point. More specifically, winning a British Arts Council Award for creativity back in 2000 for a musical I wrote is probably near the top. Being asked to present an award at a film festival is another one, and seeing the number of awards ‘The 13th‘ is currently winning is a third. I look at that and think, ‘If my mind hadn’t created that story, these people would not be receiving this positive publicity for their work and their own creativity.’

But the ultimate? It’s an odd one, and it goes back to ‘The Saddling.’ The idea for that story came to me in a dream, as a few story ideas have done. But I had never dreamt about one of my characters until one night, after finishing the fifth draft, I think it was, I dreamt that I was in the village of Saddling where I met Barry, one of my favourite characters. It’s the closest I’ve ever come to actually meeting a person I’ve created; a Frankenstein moment perhaps. I’m pleased to say, he was as much fun, just as naughty and as sexy as he is in the book. It’s probably a high point because it’s never happened before or since, but it made me wonder if these characters are real and out there somewhere living in a parallel world of my own creating.

 

Tell us all about your latest release! (Or an upcoming one if you have a new release soon.)

honestly___ebook_1560x2500The next books out are to be ‘Symi, Stuff & Nonsense’ and we are aiming for November, followed by ‘The Witchling’ early next year, and I’ve mentioned them just now. ‘The Saddling’ was my last full-length novel, but after that, and more recently, I have brought out a novella, so that’s the most recent.

The story goes:

Last year I released my gay/straight body-swap comedy, ‘Remotely.’ This story pokes fun at British reality TV and talent shows in particular. With it comes the mysterious character of Miss P, a timeless lady who casts spells on those who need them. In ‘Remotely’ she mends a broken friendship by swapping the two lads’ bodies, so they experience what it is like to be each other. This brings them together, and together they save the day and the show, and so on. Because Miss P was so loved by readers, I wrote ‘Honestly’ as a short novella (25,000 words) to see if the character still works. I am pleased to say it looks like she does.

In this story, ‘Honestly’, she helps a young writer overcome writer’s block (having done the same thing with Shakespeare in the past – she is, after all, timeless). Mark has moved to a small fishing village with his mother, and there they find resentment because they are outsiders. Mark longs to write but can’t, and doesn’t understand why. Miss P does; It’s because he has no friends. She puts a spell on the village to make them speak honestly to each other for the day of their annual Fisher Festival. Comedy and a bit of bawdiness ensue, Mark and his adversary Billy, actually want to like each other, and through their honesty, they become friends. In the end, Mark is able to write and, as Billy knows the history of his village, they set about writing a book about the village together.

That’s the kind of story I like. It’s not a gay story, there’s no ‘gay’ in that one, but it’s about friendship.

 

What interview question do you wish someone would ask you?

‘Did you know you just won the Booker Prize?’

No, joking aside – I’m never going to do that. The question might be:
“Why do you write?’

 

Answer it!

For many reasons. I like to tell stories and entertain people. I like the process of creating plots, characters, twists and everything else. I like the planning stage, and I like inventing stories in my head. I enjoy the editing and see it as a way of improving my skills. And, many years ago, when I was being interviewed for an important promotion at the day job, I was asked: ‘Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?’ I replied, ‘Living on a Greek island writing books.’ I was, and I still am.

 

Thanks for joining us today, James!

If you’d like to find out more please visit these links-

Symi Dream Blog

Author Blog

Facebook

Twitter

Grab a copy for yourself of these books by James Collins-

The Saddling

Honestly

Reader Interview- Bobbie B. Free

Hi guys! We get to hear from amazing authors about the writing process quite often, so now it’s time for readers to get their chance to shine. And who doesn’t love talking about their favourite books? Today Bobbie B. Free has the stage to tell us all about what she looks for in a great book.

Hi, tell us a bit about yourself.BIO PIC 2

My name is Bobbie B. Free (B.B. Free). I have been an elementary school teacher for 20 years. I teach Reading, Language Arts, and English to speakers of other languages. I’ve been writing formally and informally since I was a teenager. I published my first children’s book in 2015 called The Rescuers. I hope to publish it in Spanish this year. I am currently in the last stages of editing my first novel Friends of the Bride.

 

What makes a book cover catch your eye? Have you got a favourite?

It depends on what I’m in the mood to read. For light, fun reads I’m attracted to sleek, elegant, colourful illustrations, maybe even cartoons. For more serious reading, I’m drawn to an object that coupled with the title, elicits curiosity. For this type of book, more muted colors, and for some reason soft gold lettering catch my eye. I’m very selective when scanning a bookstore randomly for new material.

 

When you’re reading a blurb, what would make you want to try that book? What would put you off?

For me, it’s all about topic or theme. If the book is about a concept I’m interested in, like human relationships, royalty, history, the blurb will probably excite me. If the topic is not of interest to me, like politics, horror, crime, I won’t get past the second sentence.

 

What makes you love a character? Who are your favourites from the books you’ve read and why?

I haven’t been reading a lot of fiction lately, but I like vulnerability in a character. I root for a character who wakes up every morning to battle fears until he conquers them, and makes mistakes along the way. I love the composites J.K. Rowling constructed when creating the main characters in the Harry Potter series. I like Stephanie Plum from Janet Evanovich’s series. This character is so flawed, so real, you just want to befriend her.

 

staphanie plum novel

 

What keeps a plot engaging, and makes you want to stick with a book/series until the end? Tell us about your favourite books!

Again, haven’t read much fiction lately, but I can’t put a book down when the main character/ characters are working toward a goal that involves self-improvement, whether financial, physical, but more than anything, a goal that brings balance and peace.

 

Is there anything else you’d like to share about reading?

Reading is the umbrella that covers all knowledge, I feel. Awareness of the world around us cannot be complete without a thorough commitment to reading old and new material. And as a writer, my output is only as good as the amount of reading time I’ve put in during any given season.

 

If you’d like to find out more about Bobbie, you can find her in these places-

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Pinterest

Or check out her book and read reviews on-

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

 

Thanks for coming to chat about your life as a reader, Bobbie! 

If you’d like to be interviewed and rant about books you love, either Contact Me here on the website or message me on Facebook.

 

Interview with Ian Ferguson

Hi guys, today you get to meet a fantastic author that has released a great variety of books, check out this selection by Ian K Ferguson.

Hi Ian! Tell us a bit about yourself.

Ian picHello.  I am unapologetically a northern Englishman from Blackpool, so I’m sorry about that.  However, after 20 years of running a Software Company selling systems to Local Government in England and Wales I decided on a whim to move me, my (then) wife and three children to Vancouver, BC, Canada where I have now lived for 19 years, which has been a good thing all things considered.

Now my wife has relocated (so to speak) to an old friend for a change of scenery and my three kids are in their twenties trying to work out how they will ever be able to afford to buy a place to live (it’s a head scratcher in this part of the World).

I love sports of all kinds (except American Football, Baseball and Basketball) but really will always be a Football nut at heart with Rugby and Cricket thrown in for good measure.

 

How did you discover you were meant to be a writer?

This happened when I was 11 in an English class at school when I wrote a poem about a Stag hunt (from a sympathetic or woeful Stag’s point of view).  The teacher put a big red line through it with the words ‘NOT YOUR OWN WORK’ (which it was), so I knew it was good and I could write.

After I got sick of the I.T. industry I sat down and challenged myself to write a book, just to see if I could.  Now I can’t stop and I love it.  I didn’t know I had so many stories rattling around in my brain.

 

 

How would you describe your writing style?

In a few words, peculiar but accessible.  Much of what I write about is serious but I lace it with lashings of humour.  I do a lot of dialogue but am not so hot on the descriptive side of the equation.  The descriptive side I only use when it adds something to the story, but I’m not one to spend paragraphs describing what everybody in a scene is wearing for the sake of it or whether the rain was wet or not.  Sometimes less is more and I hope my readers can envisage things for themselves.

 

Your books are quite different to each other, how do you decide what to write next, and are you planning on branching out into even more genres?

Good question.  Sometimes, as was the case with the ‘Single-Bullet Theory’, a title springs into my head and I take it from there.  When I wrote the first sentence of that story I had no idea where I was going with it, but a sheep kills my main character’s only daughter in a field in North Cornwall by the end of the first paragraph and I had a story.  Other times it may be a topic that has been rattling around my mind for years, like ‘The Lynn Valley Orchard Rules’ (a black comedy about an Addictions Treatment Centre) and ‘Gone Missing’.

My characters such as the detective Derek Blackstone and his rookie partner Tony Hancock pop up in cameo roles in my other books.  For example, they both saw the light of day in my first book ‘Two into One’ and Tony appears in ‘The Lynn Valley Orchard Rules’.  Also, the Hi-Tec software company, ANT, from ‘Two into One’ crops up as the father of one of the murdered little girls in my latest book ‘Senseless’.  I like to give little links for my readers to pick-up on even when the stories are completely different.

But to answer your question about ‘even more genres’, apart from the detective series I don’t really do ‘genres’ as such, I just go where I want to go.  Having said that I wrote two children’s books last year based on another writer’s original ideas and that was fun.

 

 

Tell us about your eclectic music tastes!

I love English bands.  Oasis, the Smiths, the Buzzcocks, the Clash, the Sex Pistols, Elvis Costello, I could go on and on.  I love the Beatles (I know that’s a bit obvious) and Bob Dylan (now that makes me sound old I know).  I love folk music of all flavours and I write to Jazz.  I hate most American Rock Bands (apart from Bruce of course) and all things heavy metal, I can’t stand the way they sing like over produced whining poodles about to be castrated (you know who I mean).

 

Who is your favourite character from your books? What do you love about them?

The first one I fell in love with was from my first book ‘Two into One’.  She was called Kim McLennan, and she was a sweetheart.  Unfortunately, I gave her ALS and then killed her in a plane bombing catastrophe, poor woman.  The second was Michelle from ‘The Lynn Valley Orchard Rules’ who had a great sense of humour and not a little glimpse of glamour and a devilish side.  But, if I’m on the line here, it would have to be Derek Blackstone.  He is a cynical, 50 year old veteran of the Vancouver Police Department which under his crusty exterior has a heart of gold.  If you were in peril you would want him to turn up.

 

 

If you could visit any place/time where and when would it be?

Any time, any place?  OK, can I have two?  The first would be Wembley Stadium in 1966 when England won the World Cup, I only got to watch it on a scratchy black and white TV with my Dad and my Grandad who spent the whole game moaning about how we were going to lose (I was the only believer at the age of 7).  The second would be to be outside the Dakota Building in New York City to stop Mark Chapman shooting John Lennon with a well timed and aimed kick to the goolies.

 

You’re a self-published author, what parts of the process did you enjoy most? Did you find any of it tricky, and do you have any tips for someone considering taking that route with their own work?

When I had finished writing my first book ‘Two into One’ I hadn’t got a clue what to do with it so I Googled publishers and called them.  They all said they wanted to publish it but only if I paid them thousands of dollars, which was a non-starter.  I was starting to get into contact with the writing populace (a big thank you to Chantelle Atkins here) who kindly indicated that there were alternatives and I found Amazon and never looked back.  Since then I have learned so much more, you never stop learning.  Unless you are a celebrity or an already established Best Seller Author you can rule out the traditional route.  Either that or you get real lucky and become a slave.  But if I have a tip for anybody it would be don’t write for the money, write what you would want to read yourself – anything else is gravy.

 

What do you hope people will get out of reading your books?

My reasons for writing are to entertain first and foremost, and beyond that to hopefully make people think and ponder some of the issues I allude to.  ‘Gone Missing’ has very dark reasons for existing, the terrible tragedy of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which was ignored for over a decade by the Authorities, but it is still full of humour and hope.

 

Tell us all about your latest release! 

senselessAmazon‘Senseless’ is the second in a series of detective novels set in the wondrous urban beauty of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.  Wondrous urban beauty the city may well have, when it’s not raining, but it isn’t immune to the same criminal abnormalities that inflict most other large cities that make up the modern world.

The main protagonist in these detective tales is DI Derek Blackstone a thirty year veteran of the Vancouver Police Department.  Born in West Yorkshire, England he had been brought over to Canada by his parents at the age of eight yet still, in a way that Canadians didn’t really comprehend, retained the flat voweled speech of his slagheap derivations.  Thirty years of serving with the Force had inevitably evolved in to a cynical outlook to his job and the world in general.  His wife Mary had left some near ten years previously unable to compete with his life obsession for catching villains and he harbored some lonely regrets as retirement loomed ever closer.

Luckily when the call came to investigate the pesky issue of the murdered and missing indigenous women from Vancouver’s notorious Downtown Eastside in Gone Missing (which had been ignored by the authorities and politicians for over ten years) he was lumped with a raw rookie in the form of PC Tony Hancock.  Someone, he complained to his boss – the Deputy Chief Charles Hunt (otherwise known as Isaac by his subordinates) – hadn’t even learned to tie his boot laces yet.  However, the duo, during the course of the investigation, formed an unlikely, close partnership with Blackstone’s cynicism matched with Hancock’s bright eyed enthusiasm.

It is the humorous interaction between the two that lie at the heart of ‘Gone Missing’ and it delightfully continues unabated in ‘Senseless’ which finds Vancouver under horrific bombing attacks from an unknown enemy.   Blackstone and Hancock get drawn into the middle of the chaos against their better judgement whilst they try and get to the bottom of the disappearance and murders of two little girls from one of the city’s more upmarket neighborhoods.

Blackstone and Hancock are not Starsky and Hutch, they don’t indulge in screeching car chases, rather they are good men separated by their generations trying to do the best they can with what they’ve got in the real world and it’s the relationship between the two that give them an advantageous edge in their search to apprehend the bad guys and despite the serious nature of the crimes they seek to solve always give the reader due cause to raise a rueful smile.

Both ‘Gone Missing’ and ‘Senseless’ tackle major, serious contemporary issues with a gentle, subtle and sensitive touch which entertains whilst making you think.

 

Blurb-

Cynical and scruffy Detective Inspector Derek Blackstone is back with a bang…literally.  Vancouver is under bomb attacks and Blackstone and his sidekick oppo, Detective Sergeant Tony Hancock, get dragged into the middle of the chaos whilst trying to solve the horrible murder of two little girls.

Amid the despicable crimes there is the usual humour that surrounds the unlikely detective partnership to make you smile.

‘Senseless’ is a triumphal follow-up to Blackstone and Hancock’s original adventures in ‘Gone Missing’.

Blackstone is one of those characters you hope will be with us for a long time.

 

gone missing

 

What interview question do you wish someone would ask you? 

If you could have written any novel by another author what would it be?

 

 Answer it! 

There are so many.  ‘The World According to Garp’ by John Irving, which turns in directions you could never anticipate and got him a lot of worldwide attention would be up there, as would ‘Fever Pitch’ by Nick Hornby which rocketed him from total unknown to unknown heights of fame and also was made into two films (the British one is brilliant but the American one not so much – and that’s being kind), but, despite the fact that it is very funny, it is not a novel.  My first book ‘Sandrown’un’ was my attempt to write a similar book.  But if I have to plump for one I would go for ‘Billy Liar’ by Keith Waterhouse which he wrote in 1959.  For me it is one of the great comic novels of the 20th Century.  It is a hilarious short tale, set in a single day, about William Fisher, a 19 year old living with his parents in the fictional, dull Yorkshire town of Stradhoughton.  Bored by his tedious job for an undertakers called ‘Shadrack & Duxbury’  Billy lives on invented fantasies and lies, such as him becoming a comedy writer down in London.  He lies compulsively to just about everyone he comes across with all the consequences this brings.  It later became a play, a film, a musical and a TV series.

As a final thought, the name of Shadrack is used by me in my novel ‘The Single-Bullet Theory’ as part of the name of a firm of solicitors I called ‘Snennard, Snennard & Shadrack’.

 

If you could write like any other author, who would it be?

There are two modern writers I greatly admire, John Irving and Nick Hornby (see above), the first American, the second English.  Irving can take an ordinary set of circumstances and wander off into areas most people would never think of (‘The World According to Garp’, ‘The Hotel New Hampshire’, ‘A Prayer for Owen Meany’, ‘Last Night in Twisted River’).  Hornby, on the other hand, makes you bleed and breathe with the everyday things we all have to cope with (‘Fever Pitch’, ‘About a Boy’, ‘High Fidelity’, ‘A Long Way Down’.)  They are both extremely witty and poignant without telling jokes.

 

Bio- 

I am an English born Vancouver (B.C. Canada) based writer of fiction books and have been resident in Canada for 19 years.

After over 30 years of working in the Information Technology industry I decided it was time to turn my attention to see if I was truly capable of making a living doing something I had always dreamt of – writing fiction.  I wasn’t starting from scratch as I had been writing for as long as I can remember, although these were business related in the main.

My time in the I.T. industry included starting and running my own software development company (Swift LG Ltd.) for 12 years which saw the company grow from just myself to 25 employees. The company developed and sold 5 specialist systems for Local Government departments and was deployed in over 100 of the 412 of the Local Authorities that exist in England and Wales.  A quarter of the total available market place.  I sold the Company in 1999 as my family prepared to emigrate to Canada.

Three years ago I took stock of where my life now stood.  My personal situation had changed; my three children had grown-up and were self-sufficient and my marriage had ended and I decided it was the best opportunity to turn my attention to writing full-time.

As at this moment in time I have written five novels and one non-fiction book which I have self-published through Amazon to encouraging reviews.

These books have the following titles:

Sandgrown’un – non-fiction

Two into One – fiction

The Lynn Valley Orchard Rules – fiction

Gone Missing (A Derek Blackstone Detective Story) – fiction

The Single-Bullet Theory – fiction

Senseless (A Derek Blackstone Detective Story) – fiction.

 

 

You can get further information about the author by visiting his website at:

http://iankferg.wixsite.com/author—ikf

or by visiting his Amazon authors page at:

 https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B01993XRIU

or  by visiting my Facebook Fan Page at:

https://www.facebook.com/IanFergusonAuthor/

or please feel free to email Ian K Ferguson at:

iankferguson.writer@gmail.com

 

Thanks for joining us today Ian!

 

Let’s Talk About The Raven Cycle

Hi guys, today I’m going to be talking about a series that I’ve just finished reading- The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater. To be honest I’m probably one of the few people that hasn’t gotten around to it yet, so big thanks to my sister for forcing the pile of books into my hands and demanding that I read them. I didn’t know much about them except her telling me “it’s about some teenagers looking for a Welsh king” and that I had to read them because I like character-driven stories.

 

 

Characters

 

So, the characters. Wow. Every single person, from a main protagonist to a person that just features in a couple of chapters, is so well constructed and feels like a person instead of a plot device. I loved all the central characters and they were distinct with their voices, personality, and actions. And, without going into details, you really feel for each one, they’re each dealing with their own problems and secrets.

I adored Ronan the most, he has that kind of bad attitude that comes from someone that’s been through terrible experiences and then gets forced into a life that seems shallow and constraining. After the first book, I was dying to see more of what made him tick because we just saw glimpses of who he was without actually getting a POV chapter. And he has some of the sweetest moments too, especially with his pet raven, Chainsaw.

I could talk about all the main characters and what I enjoyed about their arcs and development but I want to try to stay spoiler-free and there is so much to dodge.

Another great thing about the characters is that some of them are adults, and this is YA! I like the genre, don’t get me wrong, but usually anyone who isn’t a teen is underdeveloped and seen as someone standing in the protagonist’s way. They are a parent that has to be lied to and avoided when they sneak out, or they are doing a terrible job of running the government/organisation/magical group and if they would just listen to the teenagers then everything would be better… Not in this series! The heroine, Blue, has a fantastic family life. She has a touching bond with her mother and has her aunts and cousins there supporting her too. I remember Blue’s mum asking her where she was going and Blue says something like “out with the boys to do something distasteful” and her mum’s just like “okay.” It was fun because they trusted and respected each other and felt like a true family.

 

 

Plot

 

That’s a lot of words about characters, so let’s talk about the plot for a bit. It has my typical need for magic and fantasy elements, so that made me happy. But it was done differently than most books, it starts off with some of the group only half-believing that anything mystical is out there, but more layers and types of magic are revealed throughout the series. Again, it’s tough to say much without spoilers because there are a lot of big reveals!

In another non-typical YA move, romance isn’t a huge part of the plot. Yes, I know there is the whole “if you kiss your true love he will die” thing plastered on the cover, but it isn’t the meat of the story by any means. There isn’t the unnecessary angst between characters just for drama, or every single person somehow dating or falling in love with every other person in the main group. Oh, and there’s no insta-love either (YES!).

What there is instead is a complex, character-driven plot with great friendships between the protagonists. Sometimes they have their fall-outs, but you can see how much they care about each other and the journey they’re all on. They handle situations how real people would deal with them and the results are so much more heart-warming because of it.

 

 

However…

 

Okay, it’s fairly obvious I was smitten with this series but I have to be objective. It finished waaaay too quickly. And not just in an ‘I loved it so much I want more’ way. I was down to the last centimetre of pages in the final volume wondering how everything could be wrapped up because there was so much more that needed explaining. And it kind of was, I mean the story arcs were resolved and the characters had their closure. But it felt rushed and a little confusing in some places as to what exactly had happened, there were easily enough questions left over to make the book a quarter as long again. Though I’ve been told that there’s going to be another series with these characters so I’m hoping I find some of the answers there.

 

 

Should you read it?

 

Kai says yes...

Kai says yes…

 

Despite the hurried ending, this is a series I highly recommend. If you’re looking for something that will suck you in and not let you out until you’ve drained every last page of words, this is a series to do it. You’ll get so invested in the characters that you’ll barely care what they are doing, as long as you get to find out more about them. And in my opinion, that’s what makes a great read.

 

 

 

This series is so highly thought of in my family that my sister made two videos talking about it on her BookTube channel, why not head over and check them out? (WARNING- these do contain spoilers!)

Part 1

Part 2

 

Have you read The Raven Cycle yet? Let me know what you thought. Or if you haven’t, are you planning on reading it soon?

 

 

If you enjoyed this, take a look at my Shadows of the Apt review.

Live Interview on Book Talk Radio Club

Hey awesome people! Today I had my very first live interview on Book Talk Radio Club. My host, Claire, was a lovely lady who made me feel very at ease despite my nerves (thank you!). Obviously you can’t hear it live now, but fortunately there’s a Podcast if you missed it, why not check it out? And tell me if you think I have a broad accent…

https://www.booktalkradio.info/bronze-interviews